Resistance Sprint Training and Form and Technique at Maximum Speed by NASEinc

In all types of training to improve the speed of power athletes, the concept of specificity is applied to make the movement patterns as close as possible to those that occur during competition. The study below applies this concept with resisted sprint training. Abstract Resisted sprint running is a common training method for improving sprint-specific …

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Ground Reaction Impulse and Acceleration by NASEinc

Ground Force Direction for Optimal Performance Using a Standing Start. Both the moving start and variations of the standing start are utilized in baseball, basketball, soccer, field hockey, lacrosse, rugby and other sports. Athletes who either lack the strength needed for the forceful push off both feet required during the 3- or 4-point starting stance, …

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Force, Motion, and Speed by NASEinc

A grounded perspective on human running: The information below provides accurate responses to two key questions about speed improvement from Dr. Peter Weyand, one of the leading researchers in the world on this topic. A careful read will result in a better understanding of how speed can be improved for sports competition, including two-mass model, …

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Weighted Sled Towing and Ground Reaction Force by NASEinc

Effects of weighted sled towing on ground reaction force during the acceleration phase of sprint running: There is a need for additional research on the proper use and variable control for sprint-resisted training (weighted sleds, Austin leg-drive machine, uphill and staircase sprinting, and resistance bands) to effectively improve horizontally- and vertically-directed ground reaction force (GRF). …

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Age and Ground Reaction Forces by NASEinc

Age-Related Differences in Spatiotemporal Variables and Ground Reaction Forces During Sprinting in Boys: The age of the athlete (pre-pubescent and adolescent growth spurt periods) is a significant factor in sprint performance. The study described below by Nagahara and colleagues (2018) analyzed these and other periods of development in terms of ground reaction force application, stride …

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Reactive Strength and Sprint Performance by NASEinc

Kinetic Determinants of Reactive Strength in Highly Trained Sprint Athletes: Reactive strength involves the ability of an athlete to rapidly and efficiently change from an eccentric to a concentric contraction. For a sprinter, this involves the explosive action of the stretch-shortening cycle as GRF (ground reaction force) is applied each stride, during the pushing action …

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Backward Running as a Sprint Training Technique by NASEinc

A New Direction to Athletic Performance: Understanding the Acute and Longitudinal Responses to Backward Running Backward running is an activity seldom used in the training of athletes in power sports, yet this movement pattern is common for linebackers and defensive backs in football and all players in basketball, soccer, lacrosse, field hockey, tennis, and some …

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Sprint Assisted and Resisted Training by NASEinc

Both resisted and assisted training programs are key parts of the NASE 5-Step Training Model for the speed improvement of athletes in power sports. The study by Wibowo, on the Impact of Assisted Sprinting training (AS) and Resisted Sprinting Training (RS) in Repetition Method on Improving Sprint Acceleration compared both methods for their effectiveness in …

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Olympic Weightlifting Exercises and Power, Strength and Speed by NASEinc

Hang clean and hang snatches produce similar improvements in female collegiate athletes: The study by Ayers and colleagues described in the Abstract below focused on hang clean and hang snatches to determine the training effects on the power, strength, and speed of female collegiate athletes. Olympic weightlifting movements and their variations are believed to be …

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Relative Strength and Power and Sprinting Speed by NASEinc

Predictors of Sprint Performance in Professional Rugby Players: Relative strength and power are key factors that affect the speed of athletes during the start, acceleration, and maximum speed phase of a short sprint. The Abstract of a study by Cunningham and colleagues, described below, reinforces this concept. The ability to accelerate and attain high speed …

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