Speed Improvement Focus:RELAXATION AND SPRINTING IN TEAM SPORTS

Coaches and athletes are well aware that the absence of efficient, tension- free muscular movement produces more rapid fatigue, poor performance, and increases the incidence of injuries. Executing short sprints in team sports also requires very efficient muscular coordination and relaxed movement patterns. During relaxed movement, less pliant tense muscles restrict range of motion and keep athletes from reaching their maximum mph speed. In addition, muscle involvement may occur that does not efficiently contribute to forward movement.

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Speed Improvement Focus: WHY HEALTHY EATING FOR WEIGHT LOSS IS SO DIFFICULT

Eating less and eating healthy is no easy task. You are competing against a stacked deck prepared by wise food manufacturers and their marketing experts. Research shows that the brain is activated by thoughts of foods high in sugar, fat and salt. In fact, brain activation continues until the entire plate of candy, ice cream or potato chips have all disappeared. Add great packaging, art work, smell, taste, and the right words or script and you are receiving powerful cues to eat often, even when you are not hungry, and to overeat until the food disappears.

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Speed Improvement Focus:EVALUATION OF STRENGTH TRAINING CONCEPTS

Two theories were evaluated in light of the published literature.

1. Strength training exercises should simulate the sport movement as closely as possible in terms of movement pattern, movement velocity, type of contraction, and force of contraction.

2. It is only necessary to train muscle groups. Increases in strength can be re-educated into a sports action.

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Speed Improvement Focus: SPECIFICITY OF STRENGTH TRAINING

Strength training increases strength most at the specific velocity of movement at which the training exercises are performed. Strength increases are progressively smaller at velocities farther removed from the training velocity. This velocity-specific training response has been observed in isokinetic training at different velocities, in a comparison of isometric exercise and ballistic weight lifting (movements performed as rapidly as possible), and in a comparison of conventional heavy resistance weight training and explosive jump training.

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Speed Improvement Focus: SPEED

In most every sport, speed is an important factor for success on the field, court, or otherwise. The following speed program is quite simple in nature, emphasizing proper technique as the key to improvement. Speed has been defined as: Stride Length x Stride Frequency. To improve speed you must take the components of running and improve the time/distance of that movement, or increase the power generated by that movement. Speed is a combination of a number of things such as power, endurance, flexibility, and adaptability.

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Speed Improvement Focus: SPEED TRAINING

By Bernie Dare & Beverly Kearney

This article presents a well-designed year-long periodized program geared toward the American collegiate season. The program is structured so that sprinting receives the highest priority, with all other elements subservient. Dare and Kearney at this time were assistant coaches in the women’s track program at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.

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Speed Improvement Focus: THE RELATION BETWEEN DIFFERENT PHASES OF SPRINT RUN AND SPECIFIC STRENGTH PARAMETERS OF LOWER LIMBS

The sprint is determined by the ability to accelerate, the magnitude of maximal velocity and the ability to maintain velocity against the onset of fatigue. For the sprint coach it is important to have  objective information concerning, horizontal velocity, in the different phases of sprinting and the key mechanisms to these different phases.

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Speed Improvement Focus: ASPECTS OF STRENGTH TRAINING IN ATHLETICS

By Günter Tidow, The first two parts of this article illustrate the strength requirements for high level athletics and explain the various aspects of strength and their respective influence on an athlete’s performance. The last part deals with the use and effectiveness of a selection of strength training methods.

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Speed Improvement Focus: STRENGTH TRAINING FOR SPEED DEVELOPMENT

By Harry Marra, Former US National Decathlon Team Coach,
There is no question about it! The stronger you are the faster you will be able to run. It’s as simple as that!! Does that mean that the strongest man in the world can be the fastest man in the world? Let’s take a closer look at strength training for speed improvement.

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Speed Improvement Focus: A GOOD REVIEW OF RESEARCH INTO STRENGTH

Morrissey, M. C., Harman, E. A., & Johnson, M. J. (1995). Resistance training modes: Specificity and effectiveness. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 27, 648-660.

Research on various types of resistance training and research findings were reviewed. The authors were prepared to offer opinions based on the strength of collective studies.

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