Recovery time is longer following high volume vs. high intensity resistance training

The necessary recovery time between training sessions depends largely on the type and quantity of work that was performed. Other factors such as training history and familiarity of the training session also matter. Novel training stimuli tend to make athletes more sore, despite reasonably low load and volume. Therefore, coaches need to be cognizant of …

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Recovery rate differs following strength, power and hypertrophy training

Planning resistance training sessions during the competitive season must be done strategically so that players are not too sore or have compromised performance on game day. Resistance training sessions typically fall under one of three categories: strength-based, power-based and hypertrophy-based. Strength-based workouts typically include multiple sets of <5 repetitions with loads >85% of 1RM. Power-based …

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How much volume is too much for strength and size?

For many of the Fall sports teams, offseason training will be kicking off after the Christmas holiday when classes for the spring semester kick-off. Increasing muscle size and strength is typically an objective of this phase of training for a variety of sports. The evidence is pretty clear at this stage that higher volume training …

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Lasting effects of eccentric vs. concentric training protocols

The three main muscle actions of the body include concentric, eccentric and isometric contractions. Concentric muscle actions involve force production as the muscle fibers shorten, as in the upward phase of the squat (knee and hip extension). Eccentric muscle actions involve force production as the muscle fibers lengthen, as in the downward phase of the …

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High vs Low Rep Undulating Periodization for Size and Strength

The two most popular periodization methodologies used among performance coaches are linear periodization and daily undulating periodization. Linear or classical periodization progresses from mesocycles (i.e, 3-6 week periods) of general fitness qualities to hypertrophy, to maximal strength, to power and so forth. This ultimately leads up to a peak in performance for a competition such …

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Factors that influence muscle growth

Increasing muscle size offers several advantages for team-sport athletes. For example, strength and power potential are increased with larger muscle cross-sectional area, which can be transferred to performance qualities like sprinting, jumping and changing direction. Increased muscle mass can be useful for collision-sport athletes who benefit from the added armor and weight gain depending on …

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How long should you rest between sets for size and strength?

As a performance coach, one of the first things we’re taught when it comes to resistance training are the general guidelines for developing strength, power and hypertrophy. For example, to develop maximal strength, trainee’s should train with greater than 85% of their 1RM for multiple sets of 5 or less reps and rest between 3-5 …

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Should we reconsider ice baths for recovery?

The use of cold water immersion after exercise training is a common practice by athletes and is often condoned and encouraged by both the coaching and sports medicine staff. Some believe that cold tubs enhance recovery by reducing muscle soreness and thus may serve to more quickly restore performance capabilities compared to passive rest. This …

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Should you train with higher volume or intensity for muscle mass?

Conventional training wisdom breaks down set, repetition and intensity schemes for 3 basic qualities; strength, hypertrophy and muscular endurance. Power development is a quality that does have its own guidelines, but these tend to get confusing based on the type of movement one performs. For example, power development can involve intensity ranges >85% of 1RM …

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Training frequency impact on size and strength gains

There are a number of variables that can be manipulated to stimulate training adaptations in athletes. These include volume, intensity, rest periods, tempo, movement, frequency and so forth. When training specifically for muscular hypertrophy, the overwhelming majority of lifters opt for a low training frequency (training muscles only once or twice per week) with high volumes. Body …

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