Jump squat power relates with performance tests in elite athletes

Elite athletes are a unique population. In many cases, performance-related research conducted with sub-elite athletes may not be applicable to coaches who work with higher level athletes. Some of the factors that separate sub-elite from elite athletes are that the latter can withstand greater training loads and often require them to stimulate adaptation. Additionally, the …

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Predictors of 20 m sprinting speed in soccer players

Predicting sprinting speed in a mixed group of athletes is fairly easy to do. For example, in a group of athletes who differ substantially by body mass (i.e., American football players), typically the lighter athletes will run the fastest. When physical characteristics are relatively similar among athletes however (such as among soccer players), it becomes …

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What effect does very heavy sled towing have on sprint performance?

Sprint-resisted training involves towing a sled of a given load for the purposes of developing increased force production and stride length. Sprint-assisted training involves the athlete receiving assistance during the sprint, enabling a greater stride rate and higher velocity than can be performed without the assistance. The optimal load for sprint-resisted training has been debated …

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Performance effects of plyometrics during preseason basketball training

In the six to eight weeks of training preceding the competitive season, many teams reduce or eliminate strength and power training due to increased sport-specific training such as technical/tactical work, scrimmaging and conditioning. In the sport of basketball, there are concerns that overall ground contacts of jumping and bounding exercises may be too high and …

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In-season Optimum Power Load Training versus Traditional Periodization

In season strength and power training is crucial for preventing reductions in performance variables such as sprinting and jumping as the season trudges on. Traditional periodization models typically progress from a volume-phase (accumulation) to a strength phase (transmutation) and concluding with a power phase (realization). More recently, some research suggests that non-periodized training that uses …

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Potentiating Sprinting Speed with Heavy Sled Pulls

When resisted-sprint training started to become more popular in strength and conditioning circles, the rule of thumb was not to use sled loads in excess of 10% of the athlete’s body weight. The original thinking behind this “rule” was that loads greater than 10% are likely to alter the athletes sprinting mechanics. Though sprint mechanics …

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Plyometrics before, after or mixed in with strength work?

Both strength work and plyometrics are typical training modalities that coaches use to enhance performance in field and court sports like soccer, basketball and football. Traditionally, plyometric training is performed early in the workout, following the warmup, but before resistance training. However, some have sequenced training in the reverse order and perform strength work before …

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Preventing speed loss at the end of the season

A major challenge for strength and conditioning coaches is minimizing decrements in performance (i.e., sprinting speed) as the season trudges on. In the sport of soccer, there’s been reports of nearly 5% reductions in sprinting speed at the end of the season. This is obviously problematic considering this is right around the time of the …

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Including plyometics in warm up enhances sprint speed

Some coaches are adamant about having a thorough warm-up before workouts, practices and competitions. The athletes are organized, follow their progressions and execute with efficiency and discipline. Others take a more laid back approach and let the athletes toss the ball around and warm-up at their own pace. The purpose of the warm-up however is …

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HIIT Effect on Speed and Fitness in Women’s Field Hockey

High intensity interval training or HIIT for short, is a method of performing cardiovascular conditioning that alternates brief periods of high intensity effort with passive rest or low intensity, active recovery periods. HIIT has been an area of interest recently among both clinical and sport performance populations. This is because in many instances HIIT has …

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